How to Keep Coons Off Deer Feeder?

If you’re a deer hunter or a wildlife enthusiast, you’ve probably encountered the problem of raccoons stealing from your deer feeders. Not only is this frustrating, but it can also be harmful to the deer that rely on these feeders for nourishment.

In this article, we’ll explore the various methods you can use to keep raccoons away from your deer feeders and protect the well-being of your local deer population.

how to keep raccoon away from deer feeder

Identify the Problem

Before you can effectively keep raccoons away from your deer feeders, it’s important to confirm that raccoons are the ones causing the problem. Here are some steps you can take to identify the issue:

Observe feeding patterns and behavior:

Watch your deer feeders during different times of day and pay attention to the behavior of any animals that visit. If you notice raccoons appearing at the feeder, take note of their behavior and try to determine how they are accessing the feed.

Look for physical signs of raccoon presence:

Raccoons are notorious for leaving tracks and scat around areas where they have been foraging. Look for these signs near your deer feeder to confirm that raccoons are the ones causing the problem.

Choose an Appropriate Feeder

Once you’ve identified that raccoons are the problem, it’s time to choose an appropriate deer feeder that will deter them. Here are some things to consider when selecting a feeder:

Sturdy, raccoon-proof design:

Look for a feeder that is built with sturdy materials and has a design that makes it difficult for raccoons to access the food. Some feeders have locking mechanisms or special baffles that prevent raccoons from reaching the feed.

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Automatic timer:

Using a feeder with an automatic timer can help to limit the amount of time that food is available, making it less appealing to raccoons.

Easy-to-dispense feed:

Avoid using feeders that dispense food too easily, as this can attract raccoons. Instead, opt for a feeder that requires some effort to access the food.

Implement Deterrents

In addition to choosing an appropriate feeder, there are a few deterrents you can use to keep raccoons away from your deer feeders:

Motion-activated lights or sounds:

Raccoons are easily scared by sudden movements and loud noises. Setting up motion-activated lights or sounds near your feeder can help to deter them from approaching.

Raccoon repellent:

There are a number of commercial raccoon repellents available on the market that can be applied to your feeder or the surrounding area to discourage raccoons from coming near.

Physical barrier:

Setting up a physical barrier, such as a fence, around your feeder can help to keep raccoons out. Make sure to choose a fence with a small enough mesh size to prevent raccoons from reaching through.

racoons at deer feeder

Modify Feeding Habits

In addition to using deterrents, there are a few changes you can make to your feeding habits to help keep raccoons away:

Avoid overfeeding:

It’s important to remember that the goal is to provide enough food for the deer, but not so much that it attracts raccoons. Avoid overfeeding the deer, as this can make your feeder more appealing to raccoons.

Use a different type of feed:

Some types of deer feed are more appealing to raccoons than others. Consider switching to a type of feed that is less attractive to raccoons, such as a pellet or block form.

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Place the feeder in a difficult-to-access location:

Raccoons are skilled climbers, so placing your feeder in an area that is more difficult for them to access, such as up high or in an enclosed space, can help to deter them.

deer feeder tripod

Conclusion

In conclusion, keeping raccoons away from your deer feeders is important for the health and well-being of your local deer population.

By choosing an appropriate feeder, implementing deterrents, and modifying your feeding habits, you can effectively prevent raccoons from stealing from your feeders and ensure that the deer are able to access the food they need.

Be proactive in protecting your feeders and the deer that rely on them, and you can help to create a healthy and thriving ecosystem in your area.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know if raccoons are the ones stealing from my deer feeder?

Observing the behavior and feeding patterns of the animals at your feeder and looking for physical signs of raccoon presence, such as tracks or scat, can help you determine if raccoons are the ones causing the problem.

Can’t I just use a feeder with a built-in predator guard to keep raccoons away?

While feeders with built-in predator guards can be effective at deterring some animals, raccoons are highly intelligent and skilled at finding ways around them. It’s still a good idea to implement additional deterrents, such as motion-activated lights or sounds, to help keep raccoons away.

Is it okay to use a raccoon repellent on my deer feeder?

Most commercial raccoon repellents are safe to use on deer feeders, as long as they are applied according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Be sure to choose a repellent that is specifically designed for use around food sources and follow the recommended application rates.

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Can I use a physical barrier, like a fence, to keep raccoons away from my feeder?

Using a physical barrier, such as a fence, can be an effective way to keep raccoons away from your feeder. Just be sure to choose a fence with a small enough mesh size to prevent raccoons from reaching through.

Is it okay to feed the deer in my yard every day?

While it can be enjoyable to feed the deer in your yard, it’s important to remember that these animals are wild and need to learn to forage for their own food.

Overfeeding them can lead to a number of problems, including an overpopulation of deer in the area and an increase in the risk of disease transmission. It’s generally best to limit your deer feeding to a few times per week and only provide enough food for a single feeding.

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