Are Deer Ribs Worth Keeping?

When it comes to deer hunting, the focus is often on obtaining the prime cuts of meat such as the shoulder, loin, and tenderloins. However, deer ribs are often overlooked or discarded by hunters, even though they can be a delicious and versatile cut of meat if prepared properly.

In this article, we’ll delve into the nutritional value of deer ribs, explore various methods for cooking them, and consider any potential drawbacks to using this often-overlooked cut.

Deer Ribs Worth Keeping

Nutritional Value of Deer Ribs

While deer ribs may not be as large or meaty as ribs from larger animals such as cows or pigs, they are still a good source of protein and other nutrients.

In comparison to other cuts of deer meat, deer ribs contain a moderate amount of fat and are a good source of collagen, which is a protein that helps to support skin, bone, and connective tissue health.

Deer ribs are also a good source of various minerals, including zinc, iron, and phosphorus. These minerals are important for maintaining strong bones, carrying oxygen throughout the body, and supporting the immune system.

Preparation Methods for Deer Ribs

There are several methods for cooking deer ribs, depending on your personal preferences and the equipment you have available. Some options for cooking deer ribs include:

Grilling:

Grilling deer ribs is a popular method, especially during the warmer months. To grill deer ribs, start by removing the membrane from the back of the ribs and seasoning them with your choice of marinade or dry rub.

Preheat your grill to medium-high heat, then place the ribs on the grill and cook for 3-4 minutes on each side, or until they are browned and tender.

Smoking:

Smoking deer ribs is another option that can add depth of flavor to the meat. To smoke deer ribs, start by removing the membrane and seasoning the ribs as desired.

Place the ribs in a smoker set to 225-250 degrees Fahrenheit and cook for 3-4 hours, or until the ribs are tender and the internal temperature reaches 145-160 degrees Fahrenheit.

Braising:

Braising deer ribs is a good option for those who prefer a more tender, fall-off-the-bone texture. To braise deer ribs, start by seasoning the ribs and browning them in a large pot or Dutch oven.

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Add enough liquid (such as water, broth, or beer) to cover the ribs, then bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cover the pot, cooking the ribs for 3-4 hours or until they are tender.

Pressure cooking:

Pressure cooking deer ribs is a faster option for those who are short on time. To pressure cook deer ribs, start by seasoning the ribs and browning them in a pressure cooker.

Add enough liquid (such as broth or tomato sauce) to cover the ribs, then close the lid and cook on high pressure for 30-40 minutes, or until the ribs are tender.

Marinating and Seasoning:

No matter which cooking method you choose, marinating and seasoning the deer ribs can help to enhance their flavor. Some options for marinating deer ribs include using a store-bought marinade or making your own by combining ingredients such as olive oil, vinegar, herbs, and spices.

Dry rubs, which are mixtures of spices and herbs that are applied to the surface of the ribs, can also be used to add flavor to the meat.

Pairing with Sides and Sauces:

Deer ribs can be paired with a variety of sides and sauces to complete the meal. Some options for sides include roasted vegetables, mashed potatoes, or a salad.

Deer Ribs Are Worth Keeping

Potential Drawbacks to Using Deer Ribs

While deer ribs can be a delicious and nutritious cut of meat, there are a few potential drawbacks to consider.

One issue is the relatively small size and bony nature of deer ribs compared to ribs from larger animals. This can make it difficult to obtain a large quantity of meat from the ribs, and some people may find the bones difficult to eat.

Another potential issue with using deer ribs is the possibility of finding shot or other debris in the ribs if the deer was not properly field dressed. This can occur if the shot or bullet passed through the ribs and lodged in the meat, or if the ribs were damaged during the field dressing process.

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To minimize the risk of finding debris in the ribs, it is important to take care when field dressing the deer and to thoroughly inspect the ribs before cooking them.

Are Deer Ribs Worth Keeping

Conclusion

In conclusion, deer ribs can be a nutritious and delicious cut of meat if prepared properly. While they may be smaller and more bony than ribs from larger animals, they are still a good source of protein, collagen, and various minerals.

There are several methods for cooking deer ribs, including grilling, smoking, braising, and pressure cooking, and marinating and seasoning the ribs can help to enhance their flavor.

While there are a few potential drawbacks to consider, such as the small size of the ribs and the risk of finding debris in the meat, deer ribs can be a worthwhile addition to any hunter’s menu.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I remove the membrane from the back of the deer ribs?

To remove the membrane from the back of deer ribs, start by flipping the ribs over so that the bones are facing upwards. Locate the thin membrane that covers the bones, then use a sharp knife or a pair of kitchen shears to carefully cut through it.

Once the membrane is cut, you should be able to peel it off the bones. Removing the membrane can help to improve the texture of the ribs and allow the seasonings to penetrate the meat more effectively.

Can I use deer ribs in recipes that call for pork ribs?

Deer ribs can be used in many recipes that call for pork ribs, as long as you keep in mind that the size and flavor of the ribs may be different.

Deer ribs are generally smaller and more delicate than pork ribs, and they may have a slightly different flavor due to the diet and environment of the deer. If using deer ribs in a recipe that calls for pork ribs, you may need to adjust the cooking time and seasoning to suit your taste.

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Can I freeze deer ribs?

Yes, deer ribs can be frozen to extend their shelf life.

To freeze deer ribs, wrap them tightly in plastic wrap, then place them in a resealable bag or container. Label the bag or container with the date, then place it in the freezer.

Frozen deer ribs can be stored for up to 6 months, although the quality may decline over time. To thaw frozen deer ribs, place them in the refrigerator for 24-48 hours or until they are fully thawed.

How do I know when deer ribs are cooked to the right temperature?

The safe internal cooking temperature for deer ribs, as well as any other type of meat, is 145-160 degrees Fahrenheit. To ensure that your deer ribs are cooked to the right temperature, you can use a meat thermometer to check the internal temperature of the ribs.

Insert the thermometer into the thickest part of the ribs, making sure not to touch the bone, and wait a few seconds for the reading to stabilize. If the temperature is within the safe range, the ribs are ready to be served.

Can I use deer ribs in a slow cooker or Instant Pot?

Yes, deer ribs can be cooked in a slow cooker or Instant Pot to make them tender and flavorful. To cook deer ribs in a slow cooker, start by seasoning the ribs and browning them in a pan on the stove.

Place the ribs in the slow cooker, then add enough liquid (such as broth or tomato sauce) to cover the ribs. Set the slow cooker to the desired cooking time (usually 6-8 hours on low or 3-4 hours on high), then let the ribs cook until they are tender.

To cook deer ribs in an Instant Pot, follow a similar process, but reduce the cooking time to 30-40 minutes on high pressure.

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